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UNIV 1000 — Office of Academic Integrity Courses

A guide for the Office of Academic Integrity Program's Do You Understand Integrity & Perspectives on Authorship courses.

Resources for the Library Research Assignment


The tabs below will help you find resources for your library research assignment. They are labeled by the specific types of resources listed on your assignment.

Speeches or Interviews

Books

Peer-Reviewed Articles

Non-Scholarly Articles

Online Sources

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources

Searching for Speeches or Interviews

The best OU Libraries resource to use to find speeches or interviews is Discover Local (Catalog).


On the Discover Local (Catalog) search page: 

  • Type your research topic into the first search box.
    • If your research topic is more than one word, separate your search terms with "AND."
    • E.g. depression AND college students
  • Type "speech" or "interview" into the second search box.
  • Click on "Search."
  • When the search results pull up, scroll through the results for something that interests you.​
  • In the record's Details section, there should be a description that you can use to determine if the source is the speech or interview you'd want to use for your assignment.
  • Lastly, if you choose to use Discover Local (Catalog) resources, look in the Send to section of the record to find the citation helper for the source.

More OU Libraries Resources for Speeches and Interviews

If you were not able to find speech or interview sources using Discover Local (Catalog), you can also try using the follow resources:

Searching for Books or Ebooks

The best OU Libraries resource to use to find books or ebooks is Discover Local (Catalog).


On the Discover Local (Catalog) search page: 

  • Type your research topic into the first search box.
    • If your research topic is more than one word, separate your search terms with "AND."
    • E.g. depression AND college students
  • Click on "Search."
  • When the search results pull up, tweak your results by Resource Type.​
    • On the left side of the page, click on "Resource Type."
    • Click on "Books."
  • When the search results are filtered by books, scroll through the results for something that interests you.​
  • In the record's Details section, there should be a description that you can use to determine if the source is something you'd want to use for your assignment.
  • If you choose to use a physical book, you can either locate the book yourself or request that it be delivered to the Circulation Desk via Sooner Xpress.
    • If you locate the book yourself, scroll to the Get It section, and make note of the book's location number and then click on the "View Call # Locations" link.
      • On the Finding Books on the Shelf page, there's a table that lists what floor a book is located based on the books' location number.
      • Items are shelved in alphabetical order by these book location numbers. Use the chart to determine what floor you book's location number is shelved on in Bizzell Memorial Library.
    • If you want to pick up the book from the Circulation Desk, then scroll to the Get It section, and click on "Request this item via Sooner Xpress" link.
      • When you click on the Sooner Xpress link, you'll be prompted to login and then re-directed to the book's request form.
      • On the book's request form, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the "Submit Request" button. 
  • Lastly, look in the Send to section of the record to find the citation helper for the source.

More OU Libraries Resources for Books and Ebooks

If you were not able to find books or ebook using Discover Local (Catalog), you can also try using the follow resources:

Searching for Peer-Reviewed Articles

The best OU Libraries resource to use to find peer-reviewed articles is Discover.


On the Discover search page: 

  • Type your research topic into the search box.
    • If your research topic is more than one word, separate your search terms with "AND."
    • E.g. depression AND college students
  • Click on the magnifying glass.
  • When the search results pull up, tweak your results.​
    • On the left side of the page, under "Limit To" click on "Peer-reviewed."
    • Click on "Creation Date" and then input 2010 into the from date box and then click on "Refine."
  • When the search results are filtered, scroll through the results for something that interests you.​
  • In the record's Details section, there should be a description that you can use to determine if the source is something you'd want to use for your assignment.
  • If you choose to use the source, then scroll to the View It section and click on the full text link. 
    • You can also find similar articles in the Related Readings section. 
  • Lastly, look in the Send to section of the record to find the citation helper for the source.

More OU Libraries Resources for Peer-Reviewed Articles

While​ ​Discover​ ​can​ ​be​ ​a​ ​great​ ​place​ ​to​ ​find​ ​background​ ​information​ ​and​ ​to​ ​learn more​ ​about​ ​your​ ​topic,​ ​specialized​ ​subject​ ​databases​ ​will​ ​provide​ ​more​ ​advanced​ ​search options,​ ​deeper​ ​searching,​ ​and​ ​better​ ​results. If you were not able to find peer-reviewed articles using Discover, you can also try using the following resources:

Searching for Non-Scholarly Articles

The best OU Libraries resource to use to find non-scholarly articles is Discover.


On the Discover search page:

  • Type your research topic into the search box.
    • If your research topic is more than one word, separate your search terms with "AND."
    • E.g. depression AND college students
  • Click on the magnifying glass.
  • When the search results pull up, tweak your results.​
    • On the left side of the page, click on "Resource Type" and then "Newspaper Articles."
    • Click on "Creation Date" and then input 2010 into the from date box and then click on "Refine."
  • When the search results are filtered, scroll through the results for something that interests you.​
  • In the record's Details section, there should be a description that you can use to determine if the source is something you'd want to use for your assignment.
  • If you choose to use the source, then scroll to the View It section and click on the full text link. 
  • Lastly, look in the Send to section of the record to find the citation helper for the source.

More OU Libraries Resources for Non-Scholarly Articles

If you were not able to find non-scholarly articles using Discover, you can also try using the following resources:

Searching for Online Sources

The easiest resource to use to find non-scholarly articles is Google.


On the Google Advanced Search page:

  • Type your research topic into the first search box.
    • If your research topic is more than one word, separate your search terms with "AND."
    • E.g. depression AND college students
    • In the Site or Domain box, type in ".org" or ".edu"
      • .com website typically push a certain agenda.
      • .org and .edu are typically more neutral and present the facts without biases or agendas.
  • Click on "Advanced Search."
  • When the search results pull up, scroll through the results for something that interests you.​
    • Using online resources for your research can be tricky because of the amount of information available, so careful evaluation is needed. 
      • Look to see if an author and/or publication date is listed.
      • Look to see if there is an editorial statement or submission guideline.
      • Look for author affiliations.
      • Watch out for biased opinion statements.
  • Use online citation helpers like CiteThisForMe for the citation of your online source.

More Help in Evaluating Online Sources

You can also use the following resources to evaluate online resources.

Searching for Primary Sources

Primary Sources are immediate, first-hand accounts of a topic, from people who had a direct connection with it. Primary sources can include:

  • Texts of laws and other original documents.
  • Newspaper reports, by reporters who witnessed an event or who quote people who did.
  • Speeches, diaries, letters and interviews - what the people involved said or wrote.
  • Original research.
  • Datasets, survey data, such as census or economic statistics.
  • Photographs, video, or audio that capture an event.

The best OU Libraries resources to use to find primary sources are OU Libraries' Research Guides.



More OU Libraries Resources for Primary Sources

If you were not able to find primary sources using the research guides listed above, you can also try using the following resources:

Searching for Secondary Sources

Secondary Sources are one step removed from primary sources, though they often quote or otherwise use primary sources. They can cover the same topic, but add a layer of interpretation and analysis. Secondary sources can include:

  • Most books about a topic.
  • Analysis or interpretation of data.
  • Scholarly or other articles about a topic, especially by people not directly involved.
  • Documentaries (though they often include photos or video portions that can be considered primary sources).

The best OU Libraries resource to use to find secondary sources is Discover.


On the Discover search page: 

  • Type your research topic into the search box.
    • If your research topic is more than one word, separate your search terms with "AND."
    • E.g. depression AND college students
  • Click on the magnifying glass.
  • When the search results pull up, tweak your results.​
    • For Peer-Reviewed Secondary Sources:
      • On the left side of the page, under "Limit To" click on "Peer-reviewed."
      • Click on "Creation Date" and then input 2010 into the from date box and then click on "Refine."
    • For Non-Scholarly Secondary Sources: 
      • On the left side of the page, click on "Resource Type" and then "Newspaper Articles."
      • Click on "Creation Date" and then input 2010 into the from date box and then click on "Refine."
    • For Books or Ebooks Secondary Sources:
      • On the left side of the page, click on "Resource Type."
      • Click on "Books."
  • When the search results are filtered, scroll through the results for something that interests you.​
  • In the record's Details section, there should be a description that you can use to determine if the source is something you'd want to use for your assignment.
  • If you choose to use the source, then scroll to the View It or Get It section.
    • For Book Secondary Sources: 
      • If you locate the book yourself, scroll to the Get It section, and make note of the book's location number and then click on the "View Call # Locations" link.
        • On the Finding Books on the Shelf page, there's a table that lists what floor a book is located based on the books' location number.
        • Items are shelved in alphabetical order by these book location numbers. Use the chart to determine what floor you book's location number is shelved on in Bizzell Memorial Library.
      • If you want to pick up the book from the Circulation Desk, then scroll to the Get It section, and click on "Request this item via Sooner Xpress" link.
        • When you click on the Sooner Xpress link, you'll be prompted to login and then re-directed to the book's request form.
        • On the book's request form, scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the "Submit Request" button. 
    • For Ebooks, Peer-Reviewed, and Non-Scholarly Secondary Sources:
      • Scroll to the "View It" section and click on the full text link.
  • Lastly, look in the Send to section of the record to find the citation helper for the source.

More OU Libraries Resources for Secondary Sources

While​ ​Discover​ ​can​ ​be​ ​a​ ​great​ ​place​ ​to​ ​find​ ​background​ ​information​ ​and​ ​to​ ​learn more​ ​about​ ​your​ ​topic,​ ​specialized​ ​subject​ ​databases​ ​will​ ​provide​ ​more​ ​advanced​ ​search options,​ ​deeper​ ​searching,​ ​and​ ​better​ ​results. If you were not able to find secondary sources using Discover, you can also try using the following resources: